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I know the engine is tuned for 87, will premuim (89/91/93) give me any boost in power/response/mileage. With fuel prices so high the price difference is relatively small between the differnent ratings. (1.00 vs 1.20 is 20% diff; 3.00 vs 3.20 is around 6.5%)
 

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This is a very good question and one something I too have been wondering about, I hope
someone with this knowledge will reply to this thread.
I sometimes run a tank of higher octane once in a while, will this hurt any at all too?
 

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This is not a scientific answer at all but my Lincoln used premium fuel because my mom used it and i'm not sure if it was the computer learning or what but if you used anything other then that it didn't run well. It was supposed to use regular and even after resetting the computer it still ran better with premium. I think it was because the carbons deposits made it want the better fuel, at least that's what some mechanics have told me, is that if you use premium for a while the engine will "want" to keep using it. This was just my experience with one car. I will say though that that car, a 92 lincoln town car, would get between 20-24 MPG, not bad for a v8 with almost 200k miles on it.
 

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The engine is tuned to run fine on 87 octane. The owners manual says to use 87 octane. Using higher-octane fuel will not help the engine to run any better. The only effect will be to lighten your wallet more quickly. People have been debating this and making ridiculous claims about using gasoline with a higher octane than they need for years. I find it interesting that some versions of the inported family sedans require the use of 92-octane fuel.

BTW my car ran fine on the 85-octane gas sold in Utah when I visited there last week.
 

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[quote author=xlover link=topic=77073.msg1398083#msg1398083 date=1178738671]
I know the engine is tuned for 87, will premuim (89/91/93) give me any boost in power/response/mileage. With fuel prices so high the price difference is relatively small between the differnent ratings. (1.00 vs 1.20 is 20% diff; 3.00 vs 3.20 is around 6.5%)
[/quote]

Hi xlover! :wavey: No effect. Using an octane higher than 87 for the Fusion/MKZ/Milan, or any other newer, well maintained car tuned for 87 octane, will not give you any better performance/MPG (unless it is not running well for some other reason i.e., engine detonation, lack of maintenance, engine deposits, poor quality gas, etc.). As others have already said, you will just be emptying your pockets quicker.

It is true that the Engine Management System of a car tuned for high octane (92-93), will compensate for lower octane gas by "detuning" the engine, retarding spark advance, etc. to avoid detonation and engine damage.

However, the reverse is not true. A car (completely stock) tuned for 87 octane gasoline will not "up-tune" (for lack of a better word) for higher octane gasoline.

Of course, if you get a custom tune to re-flash the Engine Management System, like those sold by Jusnes Tuning and others, then it is a different story, and the car will take advantage of the higher octane.

The short story is to use 87 octane and save your money, if your car is stock.

Good luck! :cheers:
 

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I run 100 octane and a can of NX octane booster on my V6 on the weekends I plan on using nitrous. To be honest, I see better throttle response and fuel mileage ( when nitrous isn't armed of course ). At $6.99 a gallon and $10.00 a can, its only to help prevent detonation and see better power gains with nitrous. I havent noticed any difference on 91.
 

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On cars with high mileage, there is a chance of carbon build up on the pistons. What this means it that it ends up raising your compression ratio to a point where lower octane fules will detonate because of the heat created by compressing it so much. That is how a disel engine operates, it compresses the fuel/air so much that the heat causes the fuel to ignite. The higher octane fules actully burn a little slower (or smoother) and that might be why some cars seem to like the higher octaine fules. Also some of the newer cars have something called a knock sensor (not the technical term) that will cause the spark timing to retard itself if such a thing occurs. I remember my parents having a Pontiac LeMans Station Wagon that would continue to run after the ignition was off for about 10 seconds, if anyone has witnessed that, that is called spark knocking or dieseling.
 

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I will not put anything lower than 91 octane in my ride. Of course, I'm running a Jusnes X-cal tunner. Most of the time I run 93 octane.
 

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From what I understand, there is a reason that the owner's manual calls for 87 Octane and doesnt mention anything higher...

The Duratec 24V 3.0 V6 is a particularly low combustion ratio engine, and its run to be so to maximize fuel economy (the new craze in performance sedans)...

My father's '05 Lincoln LS V8 is a great contender for higher octane ratings, primarily because that 3.9 V8 is a fairly tightly wound, high-compression powertrain. If not for the computer to dumb-down the engine, she'd likely score 18mpg or something awful... amost mustang-awful ;)

So the bottom line, I'd say, is there is VERY little benefit from running higher octaine fuel in your V6 fusion. You're much better off spending the money to get a bigger-brand, cleaner, higher quality fuel that's still regular (87 o).

Just don't buy Citgo. Because Hugo Chavez is an a-hole ;)

(added a day later - Ford reccommends BP, but who knows if thats money talkin)
 
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