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Good evening folks. Does the 2008 Fusion have a timing belt or chain? Regardless of either when has everyone changed theirs? I have currently around 91,500 miles and would like to extend the life of my car as much as possible. Any ideas?
 

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The 4 cylinder also has a timing chain. Just think for a moment. You saved yourself about a $1000 maintenance project at around 100,000 miles because you bought a Ford and not a Honda. Chains last the life of the engine.
 

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The 4 cylinder also has a timing chain. Just think for a moment. You saved yourself about a $1000 maintenance project at around 100,000 miles because you bought a Ford and not a Honda. Chains last the life of the engine.
not totally true. chains do stretch and they do break. they are a nightmare to fix if you have to. on a non-interference motor your much better off with a belt.
 

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not totally true. chains do stretch and they do break. they are a nightmare to fix if you have to. on a non-interference motor your much better off with a belt.
I have never had a timing chain break in nearly 50 years of my driving experience. I did have one timing belt break in that time period though. I am sure it is possible for a timing chain to break but the probability is extremely low. My preference is the chain and I keep my vehicles a very long time. One car I've had for 33 years.
 

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not totally true. chains do stretch and they do break. they are a nightmare to fix if you have to. on a non-interference motor your much better off with a belt.
In the 60s, 70s, and even into the 80's it was not uncommon to need to replace the timing chain on most V8s at around 100,000 miles (usually more, but not uncommon). I know, I replaced a bunch of them.

On overhead cam engines, chain design including tensioners and sprockets have been greatly improved and they seldom fail for the life of the engine.

Timing belts, on the other hand, have a known life expectancy. Materials and designs have improved greatly. Some early Volvo and VW, for example, were specified for replacement at 20,000 miles, and if you didn't replace them there was a high likelihood of severe engine damage. Those were also interference engines. Life expectancy today is usually somewhere a bit north of 100,000 miles.

I can't tell you how may times I've seen a car towed in with a broken timing belt, but it is many more than with a broken timing chain, even counting the ones from back in the 60s, 70s, and 80s.

So I'll take my chances with chains, thank you.
 

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In the 60s, 70s, and even into the 80's it was not uncommon to need to replace the timing chain on most V8s at around 100,000 miles (usually more, but not uncommon). I know, I replaced a bunch of them.

On overhead cam engines, chain design including tensioners and sprockets have been greatly improved and they seldom fail for the life of the engine.

Timing belts, on the other hand, have a known life expectancy. Materials and designs have improved greatly. Some early Volvo and VW, for example, were specified for replacement at 20,000 miles, and if you didn't replace them there was a high likelihood of severe engine damage. Those were also interference engines. Life expectancy today is usually somewhere a bit north of 100,000 miles.

I can't tell you how may times I've seen a car towed in with a broken timing belt, but it is many more than with a broken timing chain, even counting the ones from back in the 60s, 70s, and 80s.

So I'll take my chances with chains, thank you.
your right about chains breaking not being as common, but it does happen, even on late model cars. hell, alot of chains stretch and you get a ticking sound that some would write off as a lifter or lash adjuster, but its the chain. ive seen plenty of them. theres a reason car companies started using timing belts. the problem with belts is that people ignore them and dont change them. its the equivalent of not changing your brakes and wondering why your car doesnt stop.

im not looking to argue as to which is better, which ever you feel is better is entirely up to you. me personally, id rather change a belt every 100k, its not that bad on most cars. but to each his own.
 

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your right about chains breaking not being as common, but it does happen, even on late model cars. hell, alot of chains stretch and you get a ticking sound that some would write off as a lifter or lash adjuster, but its the chain. ive seen plenty of them. theres a reason car companies started using timing belts. the problem with belts is that people ignore them and dont change them. its the equivalent of not changing your brakes and wondering why your car doesnt stop.

im not looking to argue as to which is better, which ever you feel is better is entirely up to you. me personally, id rather change a belt every 100k, its not that bad on most cars. but to each his own.
Perhaps we will just need to agree to disagree, and I would tend to lean more in your direction if the auto makes provided better access to change the timing belts and would not drive the water pumps off then. I know, not all drive the water pumps off them, but many that don't still have the pumps hidden down there in the same very difficult access.

Changing the timing belt on a V6 Honda Odyssey is a nightmare. Same with the V6 Ford Probe (and its Mazda sibling).

One of the ugliest ones I can imagine is a marine engine, the 540 CID 1350 HP Mercury DOHC twin turbo V8 inboard. But then if you can afford $140,000 for one of those powertains (complete with outdrive, and some boats take two of them) then I'm sure that the cost of changing the timing belt isn't a consideration.
 

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Normal interval for a belt is 60K miles. I wouldn't trust one to go 100.
 

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... if the auto makes provided better access to change the timing belts and would not drive the water pumps off then. I know, not all drive the water pumps off them, but many that don't still have the pumps hidden down there in the same very difficult access.
This is exactly the reason why it happens.
Your average adult, pulling their car into a Goodyear for a tire rotation, isn't going to listen when they're told "There's a part that wears out and requires routine replacement. It's a core part of the engine and not really designed for easy access. We need to practically pull the engine to get it out. It's gonna cost about $1300."

Cars have brakes that come out with a single bolt. Oil pans with drain bolts. Accessible air valves on tires. Things that need periodic looking-at and service are generally designed to be worked on. The timing belt, by nature, is not. So people ignore it as long as their car still drives.
 

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The 4 cylinder also has a timing chain. Just think for a moment. You saved yourself about a $1000 maintenance project at around 100,000 miles because you bought a Ford and not a Honda. Chains last the life of the engine.
Honda civics/ cr-v/ and 4cyl Accords have chains.
 
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