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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The most common question I get is "What wax do you use?" I always answer, "It doesn't matter." If the paint in is poor condition, no brand or ammount of wax is going to make it look good. It's because wax has no abrasive properties. It's polishing, or leveling the paint, that brings out the shine. Swirls, oxidation, etching all make the surface "rough". A rough surface can not reflect light like a flat one can. With minor defects, most anybody can remove with the propper quipment, polishes, and technique. A dual action polisher and a medium/light polish is all the "weekend" detailer needs. $150-$200 is all you need as a start up. While it may sound like a lot, consider the cost of a single professional detail job is the same. By buying them yourself, you'll be able to save hundreds in the long term. Rotory polishing for heavy defects should only be done by professionals because of the potential for damage.

Below is an example of what polishing can do. It is a 68 Mustang that sat in a barn for 10 years. The paint was severely oxidized. I came very close to buying this car and am shooting myself for not doing so. It's been bid up on ebay to $5000 more than what I was quoted. Process was Meguiar's #84 compound power cleaner, Meguiar's #80 speed glaze (both rotory), and #80 speed glaze again with the dual action. There is NO wax on the car.
Before-

After-



Feel free to ask me any questions. I've detailed for more than 15 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Since it was just going on ebay and it's in need of a total restoration, there was no sense in protecting the paint. I was "putting lipstick on a pig".
 
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