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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings...
I got an e-mai response from Hoen. Just wanted to share info. regarding H11-upgrade.

If your looking to improve lighting and not worried about color then the H9 conversion would be a good option, but I would stick to stock type bulbs (non coated, yellowish in color).

Installing an H9 xenonmatch plus would be very close to your stock bulbs now as the filter robs the lumens to produce the cleaner whiter light which offsets the added power of the bulb vs. OEM 55w.

H9 mod will not last as long but its a lot of lumens!

You can run up to 70w in that housing no problem. H9 converson works on the H11 housing after a tab removal and tab cut. Its the best for adding more lumens.

The xenonmatch plus 80w H11 would require a connector upgrade. But performance is just a bit better than stock. If your looking for much better lighting, especially if you cant see ahead right now, then a swap to the h9 OEM type bulb is the best choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Greetings:

I did some more searching on headlight bulbs...Just wanted to share some info..

1. http://www.overboost.com/story.asp?id=102


2. laxman2110-31-2006, 10:54 AM
Consumer Reports
Not all bright ideas are the most economical

By the editors of Consumer Reports

Premium replacement-headlight bulbs are marketed as a functional and cosmetic improvement over the conventional bulbs found in most cars. But are they? Consumer Reports recently tested five top-selling models to find out.

Bulbs such as the APC Plasma Ultra White, GE Nighthawk, Philips CrystalVision, Sylvania SilverStar, and Wagner TruView try to mimic the whiter, brighter light of the high-intensity-discharge (HID) lamps that are standard equipment on some pricey vehicles.

HID lights can be brighter than conventional halogen bulbs, but illuminated distances are often just comparable. One clear advantage of conventional halogen lighting over HID is that, when the former requires replacement, you need only change the bulb — usually a simple task for most backyard mechanics. With high-intensity-discharge lights, the entire assembly must be replaced.

Premium halogen-replacement bulbs attempt to offer some of the benefits of HID lights while fitting into the vehicle's original headlight assembly.

The five bulbs Consumer Reports tested are priced between $26 and $40 a pair (two to three times the price of standard halogen bulbs) and are sold in discount or auto-parts stores. The test bulbs claimed Department of Transportation-standard compliance. Noncompliant bulbs may be marked as "for off-road use only."

CR's tests were designed to be both subjective (to determine how well distant objects could be seen by the human eye) and objective (measuring bulb illuminance, or brightness). Three test vehicles — a Chrysler Sebring, a Toyota Camry and a Honda Ridgeline — were used to provide a variety of bulb sizes and original equipment (OE) performance. (The Wagner TruView was not available for the Honda.)

To test claims of increased brightness, CR moved inside a dark building and placed a light sensor 50 feet in front of each vehicle — at different heights, both on center and to the right to simulate a shoulder.

Subjectively, all five bulbs emitted a whiter light than OE bulbs. That could prove attractive to buyers seeking the look of HID lights: Studies show that some drivers prefer driving behind whiter light than the more yellow light of most OE halogen bulbs. But that doesn't mean you can see farther.

In the distance tests, only the GE Nighthawk improved low-beam sight distance, and then just for the Honda Ridgeline. Generally, low- and high-beam distance either remained the same or decreased with the premium replacement bulbs.

Meanwhile, results of CR's brightness tests showed some localized improvements, but no one replacement bulb scored consistently better than OE. The Nighthawk and APC Plasma Ultra White improved illuminance in more tests than the other bulbs, some of which did not perform as well as stock bulbs.

Premium replacement bulbs may be cosmetically pleasing — CR's tests showed that they do yield whiter-looking light than original-equipment bulbs — but they don't offer a consistent performance advantage. In fact, they can perform worse than OE bulbs.

Bottom line: Outfitting your car with these dazzling premium bulbs may not be such a bright idea.

2005, Consumers Union

Copyright © 2006 The Seattle Times Company

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

laxman2110-31-2006, 11:05 AM
A bit different article with some more info:

Sorry, but for some reason, I'm not allowed to edit my post anymore, or start new threads!?

A Consumer Reports Study

Replacement headlight bulbs: A bright idea?

Premium replacement headlight bulbs are marketed as a functional and cosmetic improvement over the conventional bulbs found in most cars. The bulbs try to mimic the whiter, brighter light of the high-intensity-discharge (HID) lights found on some pricey vehicles. However, while these bulbs emit whiter-looking light, they don’t provide a consistent performance improvement in our tests.

Changes in lighting regulations in the mid-1980s allowed automobile designers to create aerodynamic headlight assemblies. These assemblies use a replaceable halogen bulb rather than an entire replaceable assembly. Headlight performance varies considerably depending on the assembly’s design, including reflector design and lens shape.

Expensive HID lights are a more recent innovation. CR’s tests have shown that HID lights can be brighter, but illuminated distances are often comparable to those of halogen bulbs. Premium halogen replacement bulbs attempt to offer some of the benefits of HID lights while retaining the vehicle’s original headlight assembly.

Bulb replacement is usually a simple task for most backyard mechanics.


MEASURING THE LIGHTS

CR tested five premium replacement bulbs, one from each of the top-selling brands: the APC Plasma Ultra White, GE Nighthawk, Philips CrystalVision, Sylvania SilverStar, and Wagner TruView. The bulbs are priced between $26 and $40 a pair (two to three times more than standard bulbs) and are sold in discount or auto-parts stores. All tested bulbs claim Department of Transportation-standard compliance; noncompliant bulbs may be marked as “for off-road use only.”

Tests were both subjective, to determine how well distant objects could be seen by the human eye, and objective, measuring bulb illuminance, or brightness.

Three test vehicles, a Chrysler Sebring, a Toyota Camry, and a Honda Ridgeline, were used to provide a variety of bulb sizes and original equipment (OE) performance.

Headlight distance is vital because the sooner an object is illuminated, the better the chance of avoiding it. Distance is measured outdoors on a moonless night, from a stationary vehicle. Black, unlighted signs were set up at various distances, and engineers recorded which were visible from each vehicle with each set of bulbs. Only one set of bulbs, the Nighthawk, improved low-beam sight distance for one tested vehicle, the Ridgeline. However, they reduced distance on the Camry. Generally, low- and high-beam distance either remained the same or decreased with replacement bulbs.

To test claims of increased brightness, CR measured illuminance, the quantity of light that reaches a particular area. Inside a dark building, a light sensor was placed at a distance 50 feet in front of each vehicle at different heights both on center and 8 feet to the right to simulate a roadway shoulder. Results showed some localized improvements, but no one bulb scored consistently better than OE. The Nighthawk and Plasma Ultra White improved illuminance in more tests than the other bulbs, some of which did not perform as well as stock bulbs.

Subjectively, all five bulbs emitted a whiter light than OE bulbs, which could appeal to buyers seeking the look of HID lights. Studies show that some drivers prefer driving behind whiter light than the more yellow light of most OE halogen bulbs, but that doesn’t mean you can see farther.

Some manufacturers claim that their premium halogen bulbs improve brightness without causing oncoming glare, a common complaint about HID lights. Oncoming glare is caused by a combination of bright lights and an inherent sharp light cutoff. This combination can exist in HID or halogen lights. Most of the tested bulb-vehicle combinations did not cause high levels of oncoming glare. But using whiter premium bulbs in the Honda Ridgeline increased glare to where it could be a discomfort for oncoming drivers.


BOTTOM LINE

Our tests showed that while they do yield whiter-looking light, premium aftermarket halogen bulbs don’t offer a consistent performance advantage over original equipment bulbs, and they can perform worse. Much of a headlight’s distribution of light is dictated by its reflector and lens, factors that remain unaffected by changing the bulb. And the combination of higher cost and some manufacturer specifications of a shorter life span than standard replacement bulbs add up to increased costs.
 

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You said:
Installing an H9 xenonmatch plus would be very close to your stock bulbs now
Then you said:
H9 mod will not last as long but its a lot of lumens!
Did you mean Installing H11 Xenonmatch Plus would be close to your stock bulbs? That makes more sense. They run the bulb hotter with more Xenon in the housing to increase lumens at the expense of longevity. This should make up for the light-blue coating these bulbs have. Non-filtered H11's provide around 1200 lumens, with the H9 giving off a near-HID amount of 2100 (True HID D2R's produce 2800 lumens). A Blue coated H9 bulb minus the maximum 15% allowed for the blue filter to rob lumens still gives 1785 lumens, or 45% more lumens than the stock bulb, even with a filter. Hoen makes good bulbs, and is not one of the companies the Consumer Reports article was written about. Hoen's Xenonmatch Plus line would give close to 2100 lumens, but with white light. To see those lamps in action, buy yourself a pair of Nokya bulbs or Piaa Xtreme Force with heavy blue filters.

Personally, I ordered three pair of the Xenonmatch Plus for all bulbs. I know they won't last much more than a year, but it's a helluva lot more light than stock, and only $37 a pair. Heck, the stock H11's cost $28 a pair at Checker Auto Parts, Schuck's Auto Supply, Kragen Auto Parts, and Murray's Discount Auto Parts stores. The extra $9 buys me 80% more light and the white (not blue) color I would like to have. If Hoen makes H9 in the Xenonmatch line, I would gladly get them for the 45+% increase in lumens from stock with better longevity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Greetings:

These are the e-mails i got back from Hoen. The way i see it is ging with the h9-stock and cutting off the tab. But if u want the light -whiteness, they provide it. But the bulb won't last long.... You can see the warranty specs on each bulb. The hotter the bulb - they give a 6 month warranty. The xeon-match i believe was 1yr...

Personally after all the checking out as much info i can get my hands on I went with the KYO STOCK wat. h11- I was afraid to go with the 80watts. but i would of needed a harness...blahllblah..

So far with the kyo's i ok/happy.. Of course i want more light...My sis {pilot} knew the diff. right away. from the stock w/o telling her.. I know i must of lost some lumens because of the blue-glass..But as she points out., you can see the road now..INMOP.

I think in the future i would go to rallylights.com -hella-- upgrade h11's 80w--plus the give a 1 yr. warranty than the 6m.warr. with kyo auto...
 

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I have purchased from Susquehanna Motorsports before. I picked up some Hella H1 +30's for my high beams and H7 +50's for the low beams on some Ford Focus headlamps. They lasted three years and were the brightest damn things on the road other than true HID lamps at the time. Getting stock wattage at the +30 or +50 level does not draw more power (they are still 55W for example), but are very bright and do NOT have a blue glass filter. Grab those if they become available. As far as the 80W lights go, you could do it without a harness upgrade and not have any wiring issues (even though some people tell you you have to), because Ford uses a separate relay for each headlamp, so there is a minimal amount of power traveling through the wiring to each bulb up front. The thing to worry about is if the 80W is too high for the housing, it will dull the chrome reflector inside the housing, and also possibly melt the plastic headlamp housing near the bulb. I haven't heard of 80W doing this too much, but 100W definitely has a chance of doing this. Remember: Watts = Power it takes to run device = Heat generated. Lumen's = amount of light output (independent of Watts). What you want is the most lumen's at the lowest wattage, which is why the 65W H9 bulb is so great. Huge light output at only 65W.

Hella 80W H11 blue-filter = 1700 lumen's. OEM H9 65W = 2100 lumen's.
:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Greetings...

Thanxs for the info...I would have gone with the h-9, but with only 250-350HRS. of life...I will tossing out quite a bit of money in time...
80w/-h11 hella xenons sound like a good option. My concern is the possibilty of housing inside the lens melting and stock wiring melting. I am hestitant....

If someone out there has had good results....please advise....

thxs
Max
 

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The wiring will be fine. The housing should be able to take the extra heat. I looked at the design this afternoon when I installed my Hoen H9 bulbs. I say go ahead.

~Seawolf
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Greetings:

Seawolf- how are the Hoen h9 bulbs? Your thoughts. Did u have to re-adjust the lamps?


thxs

Max.
 

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[quote author=seawolf link=topic=69523.msg1313845#msg1313845 date=1175781213]
You said:
Installing an H9 xenonmatch plus would be very close to your stock bulbs now
Then you said:
H9 mod will not last as long but its a lot of lumens!
Did you mean Installing H11 Xenonmatch Plus would be close to your stock bulbs? That makes more sense. They run the bulb hotter with more Xenon in the housing to increase lumens at the expense of longevity. This should make up for the light-blue coating these bulbs have. Non-filtered H11's provide around 1200 lumens, with the H9 giving off a near-HID amount of 2100 (True HID D2R's produce 2800 lumens). A Blue coated H9 bulb minus the maximum 15% allowed for the blue filter to rob lumens still gives 1785 lumens, or 45% more lumens than the stock bulb, even with a filter. Hoen makes good bulbs, and is not one of the companies the Consumer Reports article was written about. Hoen's Xenonmatch Plus line would give close to 2100 lumens, but with white light. To see those lamps in action, buy yourself a pair of Nokya bulbs or Piaa Xtreme Force with heavy blue filters.

Personally, I ordered three pair of the Xenonmatch Plus for all bulbs. I know they won't last much more than a year, but it's a helluva lot more light than stock, and only $37 a pair. Heck, the stock H11's cost $28 a pair at Checker Auto Parts, Schuck's Auto Supply, Kragen Auto Parts, and Murray's Discount Auto Parts stores. The extra $9 buys me 80% more light and the white (not blue) color I would like to have. If Hoen makes H9 in the Xenonmatch line, I would gladly get them for the 45+% increase in lumens from stock with better longevity.
[/quote]

Hi,

HOEN manufacture a 70W H11 bulb. I order them. I have a H9 MTEC bulb pair also.
I will be installing the H9 65W on the Fog Light and the H11 70W on the headlight.
It will look exactly as HID or better at a very good price. Both pairs and heavy duty
connectors or harness will be around $100.00. Way less than a $1,000.00 retrofit for
HID.

70W H11 Bulb
http://www.hoen-usa.com/ti.htm

Heavy duty connectors
http://www.hoen-usa.com/connector.htm
 

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I like the color, and the light output as far as how bright they seem they appear to be stock brightness, with the Xenon color. At least I didn't lose light by "upgrading".

Oddly, I had to raise the headlamp assemblies using their adjusters when I put in the new lights, to bring the beam pattern back to stock (from my car) level.
 
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