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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was retorquing the wheels on my dads 05 Grand Cherokee on sundaya nd decided to check mine. The book said 100 lb ft. They were no where near that! I am almost sure the wheels have never been off the car (less than 800 miles on it) so this is how they are from the factory.

I highly suggest everyone check theirs.
 

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I've already rotated mine twice. I'm good, but a good heads up for the new owners
 

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How exactly did you check the torque setting? Did you loosen the lugs a little bit first. If not, then you need to read the rest of this post. You should not re-check torque settings as it could do more harm than good. A tightener has a maximum clamping power at a specified torque setting. Once a tightener is torqued, there will be some "loosening" of the bolt head, not threads, even though the torque level is correct. When you retorque, you are in essence exceeding the recommended torque value. So, if you want to check the torque settings, then loosen all bolts first, then bring them back up to the specific torque level. 8)
 
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I totally agree with PsyDoc. I think only cuz he used big words lol. :lol: But other than that, I'm still not worried. How many times have you heard in the news someone got killed cuz their brand new cars wheels flew off and killed all the people in the car? :Ownedcrazy: :sedansrule:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
[quote author=PsyDoc link=topic=56715.msg948715#msg948715 date=1158158631]
How exactly did you check the torque setting? Did you loosen the lugs a little bit first. If not, then you need to read the rest of this post. You should not re-check torque settings as it could do more harm than good. A tightener has a maximum clamping power at a specified torque setting. Once a tightener is torqued, there will be some "loosening" of the bolt head, not threads, even though the torque level is correct. When you retorque, you are in essence exceeding the recommended torque value. So, if you want to check the torque settings, then loosen all bolts first, then bring them back up to the specific torque level.  8)
[/quote]

I first checked one on each wheel by setting the torque wrench to 90 ld ft (10 lb ft) less than recomended. Each one easily moved without a click of the wrench. I then went around and looseend each one and retorqued it to 100 lb ft (recomended torque per oweners manual).
 

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[quote author=PsyDoc link=topic=56715.msg948715#msg948715 date=1158158631]
How exactly did you check the torque setting? Did you loosen the lugs a little bit first. If not, then you need to read the rest of this post. You should not re-check torque settings as it could do more harm than good. A tightener has a maximum clamping power at a specified torque setting. Once a tightener is torqued, there will be some "loosening" of the bolt head, not threads, even though the torque level is correct. When you retorque, you are in essence exceeding the recommended torque value. So, if you want to check the torque settings, then loosen all bolts first, then bring them back up to the specific torque level. 8)
[/quote]

Everything you say is true IF you are talking about torque-to-yield fasteners, such as are used on cylinder heads.

Wheel lugs are NOT torque-to-yield fasteners, otherwise you'd have to replace them every time you changed a wheel.

Man, a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing. Too often, it's dangerous to others.
 

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Also, FYI...I believe it is recommended that you check the torque after 500 miles anytime the wheels have been removed. This would also apply to a new car since it has not been driven yet.
 
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