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So i've decided on Axis wheels for my fusion. What tires should i run?

I'm pretty much stuck between Nitto 555 rubber and G-Force KDW2's.

Anyone have the KDW's?
 

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Well, what do you want to DO with the tires? KDW's are nice tires, I don't know much about the 555's. The KDW's are definitely performance tires though. You are not going to run those year round.
 

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I will run nothing [until something better is developed by them] but AVON M550 A/S tires. They are absolutely amazing. Had them on three other vehicles.
 

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The Kuhmo SPT's perform very well. I am still shocked at how well these tires perform in wet weather.
 

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I am running yokohama AS430's and they are fantastic! I will however change back to the stock conti's for the winter. It really does depend on what you are trying to accomplish IE: year round, summer only, daily driving or performance. Some are better than others for one thing or another. There are a few that are good for many applications but not great for any one.

GL
 

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[quote author=shofun91 link=topic=41920.msg928892#msg928892 date=1157239008]
I am running yokohama AS430's and they are fantastic! I will however change back to the stock conti's for the winter. It really does depend on what you are trying to accomplish IE: year round, summer only, daily driving or performance. Some are better than others for one thing or another. There are a few that are good for many applications but not great for any one.

GL
[/quote]
GL,

Good post. Anybody come across ratings or info on the Web about mileage? I will be interested in tires that yield a comfortable ride and last a long time, 40,000 or more miles. I'll let our Fusion's AWD take care of the handling factor. Boz
 

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[quote author=urnews link=topic=41920.msg1128203#msg1128203 date=1167679970]
I'll let our Fusion's AWD take care of the handling factor. Boz
[/quote]

You obviously have some misunderstandings about what AWD can do. It will not make the car handle better. It will not make the car steer better. It will not make the car stop better. All it really does is get you going faster in low traction conditions. Everything else is all about the tires. You may not need high performance tires, but buying something cheap with only mileage in mind will degrade the performance of the car and might not make the car as safe in emergency conditions.
 

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[quote author=UtOhCop link=topic=41920.msg614784#msg614784 date=1142149111]
So i've decided on Axis wheels for my fusion. What tires should i run?

I'm pretty much stuck between Nitto 555 rubber and G-Force KDW2's.

Anyone have the KDW's?
[/quote]

I have the KDW 2's on my Thunderbird, and they are on order for my 20's that are going on the Fusion. All i will say about those tires is don't use them in the winter, they suck horrifickl, but in the rain and especially in the summer when the ground is warm, prepare to have some fun, you could shave them and use them for road race or auto x they grip so well. Plus they look killer.
 

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[quote author=Waldo link=topic=41920.msg1128380#msg1128380 date=1167689468]
[quote author=urnews link=topic=41920.msg1128203#msg1128203 date=1167679970]
I'll let our Fusion's AWD take care of the handling factor. Boz
[/quote]

You obviously have some misunderstandings about what AWD can do. It will not make the car handle better. It will not make the car steer better. It will not make the car stop better. All it really does is get you going faster in low traction conditions. Everything else is all about the tires. You may not need high performance tires, but buying something cheap with only mileage in mind will degrade the performance of the car and might not make the car as safe in emergency conditions.
[/quote]
Waldo,

I'll keep your post in mind when it comes time to buy new tires, hopefully not for three years or more. We only drive about 10,000 miles a year and the Michelin Pilots should be good for 30,000 or 40,000 miles don't you think? Boz
 

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Well, that's not exactly true... as tires start to lose grip, the car will transfer power to others (Although the Fusion's system isn't exactly top-notch). That being said, tires are grip. Crappy tires mean crappy grip, period.

Michelin Pilots, despite peoples bitching, are fairly respectable tires. They just aren't worth the cost of them.

When it comes to selecting a tire, it also depends on if you plan on switching them out for winter or not. There's some great performance tires out there, but you aren't going to want to run them in ice or snow, so that means getting either summers+winters, or no-seasons (all-seasons). Just depends on how much hassle you want/etc.
 

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[quote author=MZ6ZoomZoom link=topic=41920.msg1130921#msg1130921 date=1167842522]
Well, that's not exactly true... as tires start to lose grip, the car will transfer power to others (Although the Fusion's system isn't exactly top-notch). That being said, tires are grip. Crappy tires mean crappy grip, period.

Michelin Pilots, despite peoples bitching, are fairly respectable tires. They just aren't worth the cost of them.

When it comes to selecting a tire, it also depends on if you plan on switching them out for winter or not. There's some great performance tires out there, but you aren't going to want to run them in ice or snow, so that means getting either summers+winters, or no-seasons (all-seasons). Just depends on how much hassle you want/etc.
[/quote]
Zoom,
What do you mean by "Fusion's system isn't exactly top-notch?" Are you referring to the AWD or the FWD versions?

Nope, I don't swap tires for the seasons. The Eastern Shore of Maryland has generally mild winters but hot summers. I am looking for hassle-free tires (check the pressure monthly). Just wondering if the Michelin Pilots should be good for 40,000 miles or so.

Given the ratings I have read so -- thanks to the links provided by forum members -- and the pricing I have found on the Internet, I doubt if I would want to replace the Pilots with another set of Pilots, if they are even still be manufactured three or four years from now.

I guess there will be plenty of time to get my ducks in a row. I was just sorta looking for information about what to expect from the Pilots that are on the car. I realize that different drivers and different terrains make for different results. Boz, just curious.
 

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^ I just did work on a Fusion today with 31k and the Michelins. It still had a little over 1/4 tread left. Compare that with my Conti's that lasted 15k.
 

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[quote author=urnews link=topic=41920.msg1131445#msg1131445 date=1167860079]
[quote author=MZ6ZoomZoom link=topic=41920.msg1130921#msg1130921 date=1167842522]
Well, that's not exactly true... as tires start to lose grip, the car will transfer power to others (Although the Fusion's system isn't exactly top-notch). That being said, tires are grip. Crappy tires mean crappy grip, period.

Michelin Pilots, despite peoples bitching, are fairly respectable tires. They just aren't worth the cost of them.

When it comes to selecting a tire, it also depends on if you plan on switching them out for winter or not. There's some great performance tires out there, but you aren't going to want to run them in ice or snow, so that means getting either summers+winters, or no-seasons (all-seasons). Just depends on how much hassle you want/etc.
[/quote]
Zoom,
What do you mean by "Fusion's system isn't exactly top-notch?" Are you referring to the AWD or the FWD versions?

[/quote]

The Fusion's AWD system is the same mechanical Haldex system that has been in use for quite some time in Volvos. It is capable only of putting power front to rear (not side to side) and relies on traction control for switching power from wheel to wheel. It also carries a power ratio limit of 100:0 to 50:50, F:R, with a standard distribution of 100:0. It also relies on slip to change power. In other words, it doesn't actually sense where to put power, but rather the wheels must slip out before any power changes are made.

It's certainly not a bad system, but it doesn't compare to some of the more modern systems out there (Audi, Mitsubishi, Subaru, etc).
 

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[quote author=MZ6ZoomZoom link=topic=41920.msg1132566#msg1132566 date=1167920414]
The Fusion's AWD system is the same mechanical Haldex system that has been in use for quite some time in Volvos. It is capable only of putting power front to rear (not side to side) and relies on traction control for switching power from wheel to wheel. It also carries a power ratio limit of 100:0 to 50:50, F:R, with a standard distribution of 100:0. It also relies on slip to change power. In other words, it doesn't actually sense where to put power, but rather the wheels must slip out before any power changes are made.
[/quote]

This is not true. The Fusion does not use the Haldex system, it uses a Toyoda (not Toyota) system shared with the Mazda 6. The system is electronicaly controlled and does not rely on wheel slip. It reacts to steering wheel input and throttle position to adjust torque. So if you mash the gas it will automatically send power to the rear wheels, even before they slip. It will also react to slip like other systems.

I had the chance to drive an AWD Fusion back to back with Passat 4motion and the Fusion system was superior in wet, dry and gravel.
 

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[quote author=Showtime link=topic=41920.msg1132113#msg1132113 date=1167879627]
^ I just did work on a Fusion today with 31k and the Michelins. It still had a little over 1/4 tread left. Compare that with my Conti's that lasted 15k.
[/quote]
Showtime,
That's positive news on the Michelins (hope they were Pilots, I am assuming that they were) but really bad news on the Continentals. Fifteen thousand (15,000) miles for a new set of tires, any tires, is almost criminal. I would be severely PO'd.

I won't run bad tires on anything but I am thinking that the Pilots should go 40,000. Anybody had any experiences to the contrary? Boz
 

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[quote author=urnews link=topic=41920.msg1132748#msg1132748 date=1167928505]
[quote author=Showtime link=topic=41920.msg1132113#msg1132113 date=1167879627]
^ I just did work on a Fusion today with 31k and the Michelins. It still had a little over 1/4 tread left. Compare that with my Conti's that lasted 15k.
[/quote]
Showtime,
That's positive news on the Michelins (hope they were Pilots, I am assuming that they were) but really bad news on the Continentals. Fifteen thousand (15,000) miles for a new set of tires, any tires, is almost criminal. I would be severely PO'd.

I won't run bad tires on anything but I am thinking that the Pilots should go 40,000. Anybody had any experiences to the contrary? Boz
[/quote]

Hi Boz. Assuming proper inflation, following scheduled rotation guidelines, keeping your car correctly aligned and moderate driving habits, you should easily get 40,000 miles out of the Michelin Pilots.
I would like to add a few words of advice now (for those who don't know this info):
1) I believe the Fusion's Owner's Manual recommends 33 PSI for inflation. You will get better gas mileage (a big WOOHOO for you), better tire wear, and only a minimal loss of ride comfort if you raise that about 3 pounds to 36 PSI (I wouldn't go much higher as "The Law of Diminishing Returns" applies here). :bash:
2) Buy yourself a good tire pressure gauge (about $12 at your local auto parts store) and use it when you check your tires. Do not trust the pump readout, or try to "eye" it. Check your tires at least once a month.
3) Remember that even a tire in excellent condition loses air over time, and will lose 1-2 PSI for every 10 degree drop in ambient temperature. So if you check your tires today and it is 50 degrees out, in a month when the temperature is 25, they would have lost at least 2.5 PSI.
Good luck everyone!
 

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[quote author=bbf2530 link=topic=41920.msg1133745#msg1133745 date=1167963626]
[/quote]

Hi Boz. Assuming proper inflation, following scheduled rotation guidelines, keeping your car correctly aligned and moderate driving habits, you should easily get 40,000 miles out of the Michelin Pilots.
I would like to add a few words of advice now (for those who don't know this info):
1) I believe the Fusion's Owner's Manual recommends 33 PSI for inflation. You will get better gas mileage (a big WOOHOO for you), better tire wear, and only a minimal loss of ride comfort if you raise that about 3 pounds to 36 PSI (I wouldn't go much higher as "The Law of Diminishing Returns" applies here). :bash:
2) Buy yourself a good tire pressure gauge (about $12 at your local auto parts store) and use it when you check your tires. Do not trust the pump readout, or try to "eye" it. Check your tires at least once a month.
3) Remember that even a tire in excellent condition loses air over time, and will lose 1-2 PSI for every 10 degree drop in ambient temperature. So if you check your tires today and it is 50 degrees out, in a month when the temperature is 25, they would have lost at least 2.5 PSI.
Good luck everyone!
[/quote]
bbf2530,

Thank you for your informative post. That is some really helpful advice, which I intend to follow. (LOL on the mileage note).

I have read that the pencil-type tire guages are not very accurate. Do you have a favorite? Are the ones with a round read-out better than the digital ones?

I don't think an extra 3 psi will hurt the P225/50R-17 Pilots comfort level. They aren't all that comfortable to begin with.

Boz
 

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Hi again Boz. We must stop meeting like this!
Yes, I have a round type gauge, and apples to apples they are considered better than the pencil type gauges. Mine is made by "Accu-Tire". Cost me $12.99 at my local auto shop.
A key feature to look for, if you don't buy cheap, is a pressure relief button. On the neck of mine is a button that you push to let air out of the tire to lower the pressure. Therefore, you can fill the tire, then keep the gauge on the valve, getting a constant reading. Just push the relief button, and air releases until you get down to the pressure you need. Much easier than the hit and miss method of filling ... checking ... letting air out ... checking again ... ooops I let too much air out and have to refill again ... and so on, and so on. Also, the gauge will hold the pressure reading until that button is pushed, for easier reading.
Good luck. :D
 
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