FordFusionClub.com banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Getting really frustrated as of late trying to get the hard water spots off of this high maintenance dark blue. I've used (and properly know how to) a clay bar. I've stripped the wax with dawn, clayed, then waxed and I'm still fighting these damn hard water spots especially on the hood, roof, and trunklid. Suspect tells me the car sat neglected on the lot before I bought because it only has 3k on it. Anybody out there have a product they use or a specific process to get the water spots to dissapear? Any help is greatly appreciated. Stev0
 
G

·
The ones you can't get out are done for. That's it.


I had the same problem and took it to a professional. He got 90% out, but said some were just going to be their forever, they are less noticeable though.


I now keep it away from "hard water" at all cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
2000 grit wet-sanding, a Makita or similar vari-speed buffer/polisher and some 3M Finesse It. Then polish, swirl remover, sealant and wax. The process is long a drawn out-too much to fully explain but a lot of good websites will help. Its not hard to do--just be very patient and go slow. This will make a great improvement but if the clear coat is etched it will not remove all of it. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,632 Posts
You could take it back to the dealership and claim it has "Rail-dust". I did that on my mustang awhile back, left it with them for a few days and the paint has never looked better. Didn't cost a pennie!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,218 Posts
I've never heard of "permanent" water spots but some are tough to remove because they can actually etch themselves into your clearcoat/paint. The reason you're not seeing any real results on those stubborn waterspots is that you're only using clay and wax. A clay bar removes surface contaminants, such as sap, tar, dirt, etc. It only removes what is above the surface of the clearcoat. Wax is a sealant and you really won't remove anything with it. It can sometimes mask some surface imperfections by filling them in/covering them up temporarily.

You need to use a polish to remove those water spots. Try Meguiar's ScratchX, it works pretty well for those waterspots I see on my Fusion. Also, when using it, I personally apply it by hand and work it in/remove it 3-4 times for optimal results. If that doesn't work, check out www.meguiars.com and look at their professional line of polishes/speed glazes. Try with a mild abrasive and slowly work your way up.

And like always, follow up any polishing with wax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
[quote author=UnderEstimated link=topic=92280.msg1797700#msg1797700 date=1192992740]
I've never heard of "permanent" water spots but some are tough to remove because they can actually etch themselves into your clearcoat/paint. The reason you're not seeing any real results on those stubborn waterspots is that you're only using clay and wax. A clay bar removes surface contaminants, such as sap, tar, dirt, etc. It only removes what is above the surface of the clearcoat. Wax is a sealant and you really won't remove anything with it. It can sometimes mask some surface imperfections by filling them in/covering them up temporarily.

You need to use a polish to remove those water spots. Try Meguiar's ScratchX, it works pretty well for those waterspots I see on my Fusion. Also, when using it, I personally apply it by hand and work it in/remove it 3-4 times for optimal results. If that doesn't work, check out www.meguiars.com and look at their professional line of polishes/speed glazes. Try with a mild abrasive and slowly work your way up.

And like always, follow up any polishing with wax.
[/quote]
UE is exactly right! You will not be able to remove etching from the clearcoat without removing the damaged clearcoat. What you are seeing is something in the nature of "acid rain" and it is really quite common. Like-Nu products makes a polish called "acid rain remover" but it too works off of the heat from a rotary buffer. There will be no easy answer to fixing your problem. Try different things maybe or take it to a detail shop of good rep to see what they can do. BE Carefull whatever you do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,709 Posts
I would check with the dealer before you start messing with the paint. See if it's something they can fix.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top