FordFusionClub.com banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started yesterday afternoon with the replacement of the PCV valve. By the time I had the intake out; the alternator cooling tube, the air filter box, the fuel rail, and the lower splash shields had all been removed from the car. The throttle body, most of the main wiring harness, serpentine belt, power steering pump, and windshield washer reservoir tube had also been removed and set off to the side in the engine bay. I had a heck of a time trying to find something to hold the AC line back from the intake manifold when trying to get the bolt that holds the middle of the intake on. I finally settled on a vise grip filter wrench do do the job, and various extensions on my 1/4 inch ratchet so that I could get that last bolt out. In addition to that, the plastic part that the PCV valve goes into had to be removed before I could get the clip that holds the PCV valve on to release. Another thorn in my side was the spring clamp that holds the PCV hose to the intake. I was glad to have a Craftsman 9-47390 hose clamp tool for that because I can't imagine anything else fitting in between the block and the intake.

What I found when I got the intake off was a mostly collapsed and partially split PCV hose. In addition to this, the gaskets for the intake need to be replaced as well. They are as hard as the plastic intake material.

A word of warning: this job is definitely not for the faint of heart. I feel like I tore most of the engine apart just to change a $15 piece of plastic. I would compare the difficulty and time spent (by the time I have my intake and engine cleaned up) to that of doing a head gasket replacement. About the only upside is that it is not as costly as doing a head gasket replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
When your last thread said you where going to replace PCV I knew I was going to see a thread like this. It's crazy where they put the PCV I'll tell you that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Yes, it was a bit more than I bargained for...

Today after work I cleaned the intake manifold. It took a full two hours and there is still some stuff inside further in that I couldn't get out. It is the typical baked-on, gritty carbon dirt that sticks so well to anything it is on.

I think I made a blunder though. In my attempt to keep the electrical parts from getting wet, I removed them all from the intake. When the variable intake actuators were removed, there are two plastic pieces that attach to a square shaped rod that goes through the manifold. I had removed the grease from them as an undesired result of the cleaning, so I tried to re-grease them. I realized after I had pulled off the green lever that I did not note the exact position of the lever when I had removed it, and I could have put it on 90 degrees off from where it should be. The white one wasn't really a problem as you can see the direction of the butterflies, but inside the manifold where the green one goes, you cannot see the orientation of them. At least I couldn't with a flashlight. Is there a way to know for sure it is in the correct position? I think I got it right, but I want to be sure. Usually with something like this the part it attaches to has a half moon shape so there is only one possible orientation. I suppose I could always remove the lower actuator and adjust it accordingly afterward if I have issues. I have a bore scope, but I am not sure it would view things any better as the head is sort of long and might not be able to make a turn to view the inner area (if it is even view-able). I ask because this has been bugging me all night so far.

With the intake and the oil separator clean, I am going to make the trip tomorrow to get the parts that my wife was kind enough to call about today when I was at work (A B31859 Victor Reinz oil separator gasket, a 46034 Dorman pcv hose, a 51280 Murray thermostat, and an MS 96634 Fel Pro intake gasket set.) I had gathered all of the info from three different local part stores on what was available or could be ordered the night before and gave her the info and phone numbers. I knew the sooner they could order them, the sooner I could get them, and it looks like I should have everything to get the manifold back on the car tomorrow. I am just waiting on the 6M8Z-6731-AA filter for under the valve cover from Ford. It should be in on Monday, and then I can put in the Victor Reinz VS50639R1 valve cover gasket and get this thing back on the road.

I ordered the second thermostat because I changed it this fall and the check engine light never went off for the thermostat code. I had even bought the Motorcraft thermostat, but it turns out it was the old number, and I cannot return it because I bought it online and it was the last of the old batch from the site... I hear the updated ones upped the oem temp 5 degrees or something. Another example why cheaper parts, even from the manufacturer, are not cheaper at all. I put a Murray brand thermostat in my wife's Mazda 5 this summer, and it took care of the code, so I decided to go with that. At least I have easy access to it as it sits right now. I also still have a spare radiator drain valve in case I need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Do you have a code scanner that can read live data? Just hook that up and read coolant temps. The problem might not be your therm but the sensor in the middle of the head. The connector get corroded and gives false reading. Look on youtube for that vid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the tip, but the pigtail and the sensor look great where it plugs in on mine. The area around the plugs and the sensor inside the head under the valve cover is fairly full of oil though because the valve cover had come loose. I don't think that would affect the sensor though. The car never had a misfire in the months that i've owned it. I am still inclined to think that the new (old ford part number) thermostat is bad. I picked it up the aftermarket one yesterday and will be putting it in soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Yep.

I had tried that a month or more ago and it came back on. I should also add that the engine temp gauge never quite reaches half way when it is running. Before the first thermostat replacement, normal range was in the middle if not a hair higher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, an update on the pcv replacement, now that I am switching the engine out to the 2.5. The Dorman pcv hose is crap. I did this in December of last year, and the ends where the hose attach to the manifold and the pcv valve are all cracked and rotted. The parts of the hose that were wrapped in heat resistant tape are fine, but I didn't wrap where the clamps sit so that it would tighten ok. The rubber is just that shoddy, I guess. It doesn't appear to have any reinforcement inside the rubber either.

On that note, I noticed that the 2010's 2.5 has a different pcv hose material altogether. It is a plastic tube that is somewhat flexible.
Not flexible enough to prevent it from breaking off when I removed the intake manifold...but it has a different connection to the 2.5 manifold; more like the one that holds the pcv valve in the oil separator cover. It also seems like it is fused to the pcv valve itself on the one end, rendering the whole assembly a replacement part instead of just the valve or just the hose. Chances are you'll probably replace both anyway.

It seems like this is a real weak spot in the design of the system; especially with how much time it takes to remove the intake to service it. I saw the folks over at corksport have an oil catch can, but it still needs to be plumbed, and then there is an issue of where to fit it...
Are there any other ideas other than just plugging the intake and dropping the hose to the ground? I took this thing apart to fix an oil leak, I don't want to see oil dripping ever again. Also if someone has any ideas how to adapt the 2010's pcv to the 2.3's intake, I am thinking this is the lesser of two evils.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I have a 2006 Ford Fusion 4 cylinder. I was thinking about changing the PCV in it. I read your post and I am thinking about not changing it. Do you have to remove the intake on my engine to get to the PCV valve?
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top